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Ornamental Grass, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku-Jima’

Dwarf Maiden Grass – Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku-Jima’ is noted for being a smaller form of the much larger wild species. This makes it a great plant for the smaller garden. ‘Yaku-Jima’ is very similar to ‘Adagio’ the difference being ‘Yaku-Jima’ is slightly larger and the leaves are more narrow. Pinkish flowers appear in tassel-like inflorescences above the foliage in September, gradually turning into beige plumes as the seeds mature. The foliage turns yellowish after frost, but quickly fades to straw-beige by winter. Flower plumes persist well into winter providing good winter interest. It can be used in combination with annuals to provide stature and variety of texture. It looks particularly good when planted with large-leaved perennials for contrast.

Grow Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku-Jima’ in full sun to part shade. Too much shade will cause the plant to flower less and flop. ‘Yaku-Jima’ will tolerate a variety of soils but prefers a moist soil. This plant should be left standing until late winter. That will give winter interest and protect the crown. This grass is best propagated by division, in early spring, just as it starts to grow. This clumping, herbaceous grass will grow three to four feet high and two to three feet wide. Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku-Jima’ turns yellow in fall and then brown in the winter garden adding multiple seasons of interest.

Availability

# Description Qty per Unit Units Available Price/Unit
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OG500 Ornamental Grass, Miscanthus sinensis 'Yaku-Jima' out of stock $0.00
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Plant Details +

Size #1
Height 3-4'
Spacing 3-4' wide
Hardiness Zones 5-9
Exposure Full Sun to Partial Shade
Foliage Green
Flower Buff with Red Tinges
Bloomtime August - February

General Information +

Botanical: Miscanthus sinensis 'Yaku-Jima'

Common: Ornamental Grass

Family: Poaceae

General Characteristics: Yaku Jima' is a clump-forming eulalia grass that is native to certain areas of Japan including the Island of Yaku Jima. It typically grows in a clump to 3-4' tall. Leaf blades (to 3/8'' wide) are green and arch gracefully downward. Tiny buffy flowers with red tinges emerge in fluffy panicles above the foliage in August-September. Panicles fade to silver in fall, but remain showy throughout winter. Foliage turns reddish-brown in fall fading to tan over winter. 'Yaku Jima' is sometimes described in commerce as being a dwarf form of Miscanthus sinensis 'Gracillimus'. Ornamental Grasses are gaining in popularity all over the U.S. due to their undemanding nature and long lasting, year round beauty. There is nothing that adds such interesting forms, textures and movement to a garden, than with this diverse plant group. They can be planted along banks of ponds, incorporated into perennial gardens, grouped together, utilized as a ground cover along walkways, paths or on steep banks. They aren't fussy about soil requirements, are drought tolerant as well as insect and disease resistant.

Tip: Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. It is tolerant of a wide range of soils from well-drained sandy soils to the heavy clays soils. Prefers moist soils. Best in full sun. Less vigorous with decreased flowering and tendency to flop in too much shade. Tolerant of summer heat and humidity. Clumps slowly expand in circumference by short rhizomes, but retains a tight clump shape. Foliage should be left standing throughout the winter for visual interest and to provide protection for the crowns. Cut foliage to the ground in late winter just before new shoots appear. Propagate by division of the crown

Use: Dig a hole large enough to hold the roots. Fill the hole with water and position the plant so the crown (where the root meets the stem) is just slightly below the soil line. Fill the hole with soil and water again. A slow release fertilizer may be used each spring, though it's not necessary.

Planting/Care Instructions +

Pests or Diseases: No frequently occurring insect or disease problems. In some areas of the U.S., Miscanthus mealybug and Miscanthus blight are becoming significant problems. Miscanthus mealybug causes stunted growth and is difficult to eradicate because it lives inside the stems. Miscanthus blight is a fungal disease, which attacks the blades and sheaths. Reportedly has good resistance to rust.

Planting Instructions: Dig a hole large enough to hold the roots. Fill the hole with water and position the plant so the crown (where the root meets the stem) is just slightly below the soil line. Fill the hole with soil and water again. A slow release fertilizer may be used each spring, though it's not necessary.