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Geranium (Hardy Geranium or Crane’s Bill) ‘New Hampshire

Geranium ‘New Hampshire Purple’ attracts butterflies for your pleasure! It has showy, magenta-purple flowers that bloom on and off all summer long over slowly spreading mounds of finely dissected foliage. They are very drought tolerant and the mounds look great all season long, even in the fall. They are easy to grow, drought tolerant, and very dependable. Use it as a border plant or in small groups where the foliage and flowers will make a great addition to any garden. Foliage often turns attractive shades of red in autumn. Plants of this species are often commonly called bloody cranesbill in reference to the deep red flowers and crane-like seed heads.

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GR743 Geranium (Hardy Geranium or Crane's Bill) 'New Hampshire out of stock $0.00
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Plant Details +

Size #1
Height 15-18"
Spacing 12-18"
Hardiness Zones 3-8
Exposure Full Sun-Partial Shade
Foliage Fine Fern-like Green Leaves
Flower Deep Magenta-Purple
Bloomtime May-June

General Information +

Botanical: Geranium sanguineum 'New Hampshire Purple'

Common: Crane's Bill

Family: Geraniaceae

General Characteristics: This hardy geranium cultivar is a clump-forming perennial which forms a spreading mound of foliage that typically grows to 12" tall but spreads to 18" wide. Features 5-petaled, deep magenta flowers (3/4" diameter) and deeply-lobed, dark green leaves. Primarily blooms in May and June in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area, but may bloom throughout the summer in cooler northern climates. Sparse summer or fall rebloom may occur in some locations, particularly if plants are cut back hard. Foliage often turns attractive shades of red in autumn. Plants of this species are often commonly called bloody cranesbill in reference to the deep red flowers and crane-like seed heads.

Use: Rock gardens. Borders. Cottage gardens. Specimen, ground cover or edger.

Planting/Care Instructions +

Pests or Diseases: No serious insect or disease problems.

Planting Instructions: Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 1-2 inches below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerates some drought, but prefers and spreads best in moist, humusy soils with good drainage. Side stems may be removed at any time to control spread. Foliage may decline after flowering in hot summer climates. Plants may be cut or sheared back after flowering to rejuvenate, shape and/or encourage rebloom. If not sheared/deadheaded, some self-seeding may occur in ideal growing conditions.